This solar water purifier can solve the problem of safe drinking water in rural households 

|
Saturday, June 10, 2017
this solar water purifier can solve the problem of safe drinking water in rural households 

Imagine if water could be made potable using a few pieces of cotton cloth, glass tubes and sunlight!

Nimbkar Agricultural Research Institute (NARI), an NGO working in rural Maharashtra, has developed a unique and low cost solar water purifier for rural households. 

NARI’s innovative water purifier cleans the water in two steps. In the first stage, the water flows through four-layered cotton sari cloth to remove the particulate matter and then the filtered water is heated at 45 degree C for  three hours, using the sunlight. “All the disease causing micro-organisms can be deactivated if water is heated either at 60 degree C for 15 minutes or 45 degree C for 3 hours,” says Anil K Rajvanshi, director, NARI.

The purifier has four slanting tubular solar water heaters attached to a manifold with a receptacle at the top to receive the water filtered through sari. Each tube has a capacity to hold three-litre water. "These tubes are made of toughened glass similar to the one used in thermos flasks. It helps in maintaining the temperature of the water long enough to sterilize it," he says. 

The NARI purifier is based on the old method of filtering the water using a cotton cloth and boiling it to kill the germs. "The difference is we are using heat from the sun, which is freely available across India," he says. It purifies a maximum of 15 litres of water every day, enough for a family of four.

The purifier costs around 3500 rupees but it is one time investment. The cost, says Rajvanshi, can be brought down to 1500 rupees if it is mass produced. 

The only consumable is the cotton cloth. It has to be washed everyday, and it lasts about a year. 

The organisation is now exploring the possibility of scaling up this technology for village level application. The aim is to purify 30,000-40,000 litres of water for the entire village. 

0 Comment

I lost and found myself in pursuit of happiness

I sat down in a corner, and my every activity from morning till evening flashed before my eyes. I felt vulnerable, weak. What had I been doing all these years? I asked mys....

The Beijing strain is the most commonly found strain in Asia, including India: Dr Sarah Dunstan

Dr Sarah Dunstan, a senior research fellow at Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, talks about her latest study on tuberculosis, and how it is go....

This robot-assisted digital 360 degree breast thermography device may help detect breast cancer at an early stage

The new device might address all three inhibitions a woman generally have while going for a regular breast cancer screening....

Diabetes, heart disease and stroke may co-occur

Researchers say that diabetes, heart disease, and stroke may progress from one to another sequentially through the life course. That means there is ....

The event will bring together individuals, public, private and civil society members who have been involved in the design and implementation of health care i...