Diabetes, heart disease and stroke may co-occur
HP Correspondent| Thursday, April 12, 2018
Summary:

Researchers say that diabetes, heart disease, and stroke may progress from one to another sequentially through the life course. That means there is a co-occurrence of two or three of these conditions.

In a 20-year long study, 13,714 middle-aged Australian women between the 45–50 years of age were recruited in 1996 and have been followed for 2 decades. Data on their health conditions--diabetes, heart disease, stroke as well as potential risk factors--was collected every three years until 2016.

Researchers say that stroke was associated with increased risk of progression to diabetes or heart disease. Researchers also found that social inequality, obesity, hypertension, physical inactivity, smoking, or having other chronic conditions were also associated with increased risk of multimorbidity. 

They found that women may experience two or more of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke as they age.
 

Read the full research here
My fight with cancer strengthened my belief in humanity, in relations beyond blood

In the 21st century when people live such materialistic lives and machines have taken over most of the manual work, there are things which are still in the hands of humans....

Personalised medicine can help India fight burgeoning incidence of cancer: Prof Justin Stebbing

Justin Stebbing, professor, cancer medicine and oncology at Imperial College, London, talks about how genetics and immunotherapy can revolutionise cancer care....

This robot-assisted digital 360 degree breast thermography device may help detect breast cancer at an early stage

The new device might address all three inhibitions a woman generally have while going for a regular breast cancer screening....

Diabetes, heart disease and stroke may co-occur

Researchers say that diabetes, heart disease, and stroke may progress from one to another sequentially through the life course. That means there is ....

The event will bring together individuals, public, private and civil society members who have been involved in the design and implementation of health care i...